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|nF*OCOII\ INTERACTIVE FICTION 

FANTASY 



STANDARD LEVEL 



TAKE THEIR WORDS FOR IT! 

"...the 'Star Wars' of interactive computer adventure games, 
a sophisticated entertainment that touches the intellect 
as well as the adrenal glands. " 

THE DETROIT FREE PRESS 

" The program is so lifelike I find myself talking to it. " 
Curtis, 26, Salesclerk 
Phoenix 

"/ use ZORK with new employees to get them to relax with the computer 
(before they learn their regular jobs). " 
Lawrence, 44, Manager 
Pacific Palisades, California 

"As I typed READ THE LEAFLET, L felt the hair on my neck prickle. 
L remembered having the same sensation on first reading Edgar Allen Poe at age 11. 
It was as if a little voice were saying, 'This is creepy and weird... but don't put it down!' 
1 barely noticed my wife tiptoe out of the room. " 
From "How ZORK Took Over My Life," 

by Mike Oppenheim, M.D. 
In MEDICAL ECONOMICS magazine 

"Nice big vocabulary, mind-boggling situations and logical thinking. 
1 can use my brain!!" 
Diane, 14 
Omaha 

"Great!!" 
Douglas, 47, Teacher 
Mountain View, California 

"All-Time Most Popular Adventure" 

SOFTALK READERS' POLL 



"WOW!" 
Michael, 37, Minister 
Lubbock, Texas 



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by Froboz Mum bar 



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Ftobozz Magic Book Company t 
Copied right in the year 896. Ali rights reversed. 



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02/06/897 


09/22/918 




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06/07/903 






01/34/917 






04/04/917 






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lihrarv- books belong to even-one 



CHAPTER ONE 



The I iclliu sr fcing 




n 659 GUE*, the Kingdom of 
Quendor was relatively small, encom- 
passing seven-and-a-half provinces on 
the western shore of the Great Sea, an 
agrarian land whose major products 
were rope and mosquito netting. It was the thirty-first 
year of the reign of Zilbo III, part of a dynasty dating 
back more than six centuries to Entharion the Wise, the 
first King of Quendor. However, that dynasty was 
about to end with the ascension of Duncanthrax to 
the throne of Quendor on the final day of 659. 

Little is known about what became of Zilbo after 
659. Some say he was killed during a palace revolt, or 
simply died from too much reveling while celebrating 
the upcoming New Year. There is evidence that he 
was exiled to a villa where he invented the card game 
Double Fanucci. 

Likewise, historians disagree about Duncanthrax's 
life prior to 659. A petition signed by palace guards 
in 657, asking for an increase in the mosquito netting 
allotment, bears a signature that looks suspiciously 
like "Duncanthrax." Some historians insist that 
Duncanthrax was general of the Royal Militia. One 



* Adding "GUE" after a year did not become common practice until the 
latter part of the eighth century. 



legend even suggests that Duncanthrax was a demon 
who assumed human form. Another legend describes 
him as a former rope salesman. 

Whatever his origins, Duncanthrax quickly devel- 
oped a reputation for cruelty, bloodthirstiness and 
aggressiveness, thus earning himself the nickname 
"The Bellicose King." He raised a tremendous army 
and began a systematic conquest of the neighboring 
kingdoms. Within three years, Duncanthrax ruled an 
empire that controlled virtually all the land between 
the Great Sea and the Kovalli Desert. 




An ancient villa on the outskirts of Mithicus, similar to the one where Zilbo 
may have lived in exile. 



Questions, Discussions, Projects and Further Readings: 

1. Would you have left a job as a rope salesman to become King of Quendor? List the pros and cons. 

2. Find Quendor on a modern map. Is it a large area? What natural features of the area would have helped 
Quendor to conquer all the neighboring lands? 

3. Do you think that Duncanthrax was a mean king for attacking other kingdoms? What other reasons besides 
meanness might he have had? 

4. Stage a mock peace conference, with one of your classmates playing Duncanthrax and other classmates 
playing the kings of the surrounding lands. The other kings should try to convince Duncanthrax not to 
attack them. 

5. Read The New Year's Revolt, by Jezbar Foolion. 



CHAPTER TWO 

An Empire 
Gees llmk t (ilium! 

incensed that this vast land existed outside his domin- 
ion, and spent many nights storming the halls of his 
castle bellowing at his servants and advisors. Then, 
one day, he had a sudden inspiration: assemble a 
huge fleet, cross the Great Sea and conquer the lands 
on the eastern shore. Not only would he extend his 
empire, but he'd finally have a market for all that use- 
less granola. 

As Duncanthrax's invasion swept across the new 
lands, he made a startling discovery: huge caverns 
and tunnels, populated by gnomes, trolls and other 
magical races, all of whom loved granola. Even as 
Duncanthrax conquered this region, his imagination 
was inspired by this natural underground formation. 




n 665, the forces of Duncanthrax van- 
quished the Antharian Armada at the 
famous battle of Fort Griffspotter. The 
island-nation of Antharia was, at the 
time, the world's premier sea power, 
and this victory gave Duncanthrax undisputed con- 
trol of the Great Sea and put the superb ship-building 
facilities of Antharia at his disposal. (The conquest of 
Antharia also gave Duncanthrax possession of Anthar- 
ia's famed granola mines. Unfortunately, no one in 
Quendor liked granola.) 

Within months, Quendor's navy was returning 
from voyages with tales of a magical land on the dis- 
tant eastern shore of the Great Sea. Duncanthrax was 




In 666, Duncanthrax' s navy returned from its expedition to the eastern shore of the Great Sea with tales of a magical underground civilization (left) 
and giant red x's (right). 



If these caverns and tunnels were possible in nature, 
so might they be formed by humans! Duncanthrax 
realized that by burrowing into the ground he could 
increase the size of his empire fivefold or even tenfold! 

The Frobozz Magic Construction Company (the 
forerunner of the modern industrial giant FrobozzCo 
International) was formed to undertake this project in 
668. For the remaining 20 years of Duncanthrax' s 



reign, cavern-building continued at a breakneck pace. 
The natural caverns in the eastern lands were ex- 
panded tremendously, and new caverns and passages 
were dug in the western lands, chiefly in the vicinity 
of Duncanthrax's castle, Egreth. By the time of his 
death in 688, Duncanthrax ruled virtually all territory 
in the known world, above and below ground. 



EXPENDATURES OF THREE ROYAL GOVERNMENTS 



14% 2% Royal 

Military / \ Bureaucracy 




580 GUE 




680 GUE 




1% Military 

780 GUE 



These pie charts show the fiscal priorities of the Empire under three kings who ruled centuries apart: Bozbo IV, Duncanthrax and Dimwit Flathead. 



Questions, Discussions, Projects and Further Readings: 

1. What would it be like to live underground? If there are any caves near your home, spend a week underground 
to see what it's like. 

2. Read Construction of the Empire, by Mumboz Agrippa, Wouldn't It Be Fun To Live Underground? by Lorissa 
Frob and The Seventy Year Snidgel, by Harv Dornfrob. 



CHAPTER THREE 



The f LiTin lit h 




fter Duncanthrax, the throne was occu- 
pied by a long series of his descen- 
dants. These were unspectacular rulers, 
who took on the surname Flathead, for 
obscure reasons not necessarily related 
to the planar shape of their pates. During this period, 
there was very little change in the Empire, as the con- 
quered kingdoms were assimilated into Quendor and 
the frantic pace of tunneling gradually abated. 

In 770, nearly a century after the death of Duncan- 
thrax, his great-great-grandson, Dimwit Flathead, 
assumed the throne. Lord Dimwit, as he liked to be 
called, was a colorful character, but was also the single 
worst ruler the Empire ever produced. His vanity was 
surpassed only by his outrageous sense of proportion. 
For example, his coronation took 13 years to plan (and 
therefore took place two-thirds of the way through his 
reign), lasted an additional year and a half, and cost 12 
times the Empire's GNP. 



Dimwit was the first king to call Quendor "The 
Great Underground Empire," and within a few years 
the new name had completely displaced the older 
one. Dimwit also renamed the Great Sea "the Flat- 
head Ocean," and seemed to prefer the newer lands on 
the eastern shore. He even moved the Empire's capi- 
tal from Egreth (in the westlands) to Flatheadia (in the 
eastlands). 

While Dimwit certainly inherited Duncanthrax's 
ambition and ingratiating personality, he directed 
them in a somewhat less productive fashion. Whereas 
Duncanthrax used his power to expand his empire, 
Dimwit was motivated to realize his bizarre whims. 
Raising the kingdom's tax rate to just over 98%, Dim- 
wit began a series of grandiose projects that soon 
earned him the title "Flathead the Excessive." Among 
these projects: the construction of mammoth Flood 
Control Dam Number Three (a massive edifice with 
virtually no useful purpose, since it never rains under- 



IMPORTANT POLITICAL AND CULTURAL EVENTS 



Cultural Events 



in* 



Political Events 



»0 L 



^4 Sc 



This time line shows the dates of some of the events that shaped the history of The Great Underground Empire. Cultural events are listed above the time line 
and political events are listed below. 





Lord Dimwit erected a nine-bloit-high statue of himself to lend credence to the Royal motto, "A truly great leader is larger than life.' 



ground), the creation of the Royal Museum (to house 
the crown jewels), the defoliation of four hundred 
thousand acres of lush forest (to erect a nine-bloit-high 
statue of himself in the Fublio Valley) and the produc- 
tion of enormous granola smelters of Plumbat. 



Just before his death in 789, Flathead was rumored 
to be planning his greatest dream: the creation of a 
new continent in the center of the Flathead Ocean. 
The outline and contours of the new continent would 
have been a gigantic reproduction of his own visage. 



Questions, Discussions, Projects and Further Readings: 

1. How many things can you think of that are named after the Flatheads? Make a list. 

2. Try to collect 10 zorkmids from everyone on your block, telling them that the money will be used to erect a 
giant statue of yourself. Use force if necessary. See if the others on your block begin to resent you. 

3. Read The Lives of the Twelve Flatheads, by Boswell Barwell. 



CHAPTER FOUR 

fall iff the Empire 



THE KINGS OF QUENDOR 



The Entharion Dynasty 




The Flathead Dynasty 




Entharion the Wise 


0-41 


Duncanthrax the Bellicose 


659-688 


Mysterion the Brave 


41-55 


Belwit the Flat 


688-701 


Zylon the Aged 


55-398 


Frobwit the Flatter 


701-727 


Zilbo I 


398-423 


Timberthrax Flathead 


727-738 


Bozbo I 


423-429 


Phloid Flathead 


738-755 


Zilbo II 


429-451 


Mumberthrax Flathead 


755-770 


Harmonious Fzort 


451-477 


Dimwit Flathead 


770-789 


Bozbo II 


477-481 


Loowit Flathead 


789-813 


Thaddium Fzort 


481-545 


Duncwit Flathead 


813-843 


Mumbo I 


545-569 


Barbawit Flathead 


843-845 


Bozbo III 


569-575 


Idwit Oogle Flathead 


845-881 


Bozbo IV 


575-619 


Wurb Flathead 


881-883 


Mumbo II 


619-628 






Zilbo III 


628-659 








lthough Dimwit was certainly the most 
flagrantly indulgent ruler in the history 
of The Great Underground Empire, 
most of the Flatheads who followed 



—I him did their best to uphold the tradi- 
tion of excessiveness. The high level of taxation con- 
tinued, although the money was increasingly spent 
not on massive construction projects but on extrava- 
gant parties and long vacation trips for members of 
the Royal Family. 

In 883, after countless years of decadence and over- 
taxation, The Great Underground Empire collapsed, 
the Royal Treasury was sacked and everyone moved 
somewhere else. 



This table shows the rulers of Quendor, later known as The Great Under- 
ground Empire, through its collapse in 883 GUE. 



Questions, Discussions, Projects and Further Readings: 

1. Collect several horses for yourself and your classmates. Ride through the center of your town, pillaging 
stores, burning homes and slaughtering young children and old women. Afterwards, ask people around 
town what it was like to live in a lawless state. 

2. Read The Dar\Age ofFrobozz, by Sybar Zeebin and So You Want To Sac\ an Empire, by Uncle Frobizzmus. 



Instruction 
Manual for 
ZORK I: 

The Great Underground Empire 



Instruction Manual 9 



Instruction Manual 



Instruction Manual for ZORK I: 
The Great Underground Empire 

Welcome to ZORK! You are about to experience a 
classic interactive fantasy, set in a magical universe. 
The ZORK trilogy takes place in the ruins of an an- 
cient empire lying far underground. You, a dauntless 
treasure-hunter, are venturing into this dangerous 
land in search of wealth and adventure. Because 
each part of the ZORK saga is a completely indepen- 
dent story, you can explore them in any order. How- 
ever, since ZORK I is the least difficult, it is usually 
the best place to begin. 

Many strange tales have been told of the fabulous 
treasures, exotic creatures and diabolical puzzles in 
the Great Underground Empire. As an aspiring ad- 
venturer, you will undoubtedly want to locate the 
treasures and deposit them in your trophy case. 
You'd better equip yourself with a source of light (for 
the caverns are dark) and weapons (for some of the 
inhabitants are unfriendly — especially the thief, a 
skilled pickpocket and ruthless opponent). 

If you're experienced with Infocom's interactive 
fiction, you may not feel like reading this entire man- 
ual. However, you should at least read about scoring 
(on page 12) and look at the appendix of recognized 
verbs (on page 19). 



Table of Contents 

An Overview 

• What is interactive fiction? 

• Moving around 

• Turns and scoring 

Tips for Novices 

Nine useful pointers about interactive 
fiction 

Communicating with ZORK 

• Basic sentences 

• Complex sentences 

• Talking to characters in the story 

• Vocabulary limitations 

Starting and Stopping 

• Starting ZORK ("Booting Up") 

• Saving and restoring 

• Quitting and restarting 

Appendix A: Quick Reference Guide 

This briefly describes the most impor- 
tant things to know about interactive 
fiction. It is vital that you know all these 
things before you begin your adventure. 

Appendix B: Important Commands 

Appendix C: Some Recognized Verbs 

Appendix D: ZORK Complaints 



Appendix E: 



Sample Transcript 
and Map 



Appendix F: We're Never Satisfied 

Appendix G: If You Have Technical 
Problems 

Appendix H: Author Biographies 

Appendix I: Warranty and Copyright 
Information 



Page 12 



13 



14 



16 



17 



18 
19 
20 
21 

23 
23 

24 
24 



Instruction Manual 1 



An Overview 

Interactive fiction is a story in which you are the main 
character. Your own thinking and imagination deter- 
mine the actions of that character and guide the story 
from start to finish. 

Each work of Infocom's interactive fiction, such 
as the three ZORK adventures, presents you with a 
series of locations, items, characters and events. You 
can interact with these in a variety of ways. 

To move from place to place, type the direction 
you want to go. When you begin your adventure, it's 
a good idea to become familiar with your surround- 
ings by exploring every location and reading each 
description carefully. (You may notice that ZORK 
occasionally refers to a location as a "room," even if 
you are outdoors.) As you explore the Empire, it is 
helpful to draw a map of the geography. 



An important element of interactive fiction is puz- 
zle-solving. You should think of a locked door or a 
ferocious beast not as a permanent obstacle, but 
merely as a puzzle to be tackled. Solving puzzles will 
frequently involve bringing a certain item with you 
and then using it in the proper way. 

In ZORK, time passes only in response to your 
input. You might imagine a clock that ticks once for 
each sentence you type, and the adventure progress- 
es only at each tick. Nothing happens until you 
type a sentence and press the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key, so you can plan your turns as slowly and care- 
fully as you want. 

To measure your progress, ZORK I keeps track of 
your score. You'll get points for solving puzzles, 
acquiring treasures, performing certain actions and 
visiting certain locations. You will also get points for 
putting treasures into the trophy case. There may be 
a penalty for getting "killed." 



12 Instruction Manual 



Tips for Novices 

1. Draw a map. It should include each location, the 
directions connecting it to adjoining locations and any 
interesting objects there. (See the small sample map 
that goes along with the sample transcript on page 
21.) Some puzzles are almost impossible to solve 
without completely mapping the area. Note that 
there are 10 possible directions, plus IN and OUT. 
And since some passages twist and curve, going 
NORTH from Place A to Place B doesn't always mean 
that SOUTH will take you back to Place A. 

2. Most objects that you can pick up are important, 
either as treasures or as solutions to puzzles, or 
both! 

3. Save your place often. That way, if you mess up 
or get "killed," you won't have to start over from the 
beginning. See page 16 for instructions. 

4. Read carefully. There are often clues in the de- 
scriptions of locations and objects, as well as in la- 
bels, engravings, books and so on. Even strange or 
dangerous actions may provide clues and might 
prove to be fun! You can always save your position 
first if you want. Here's a fun example: 

> PUT ON THE GREEN CALICO HAT 

The munchkins giggle, but remain unconvinced that 

you're a witch. 

You've just learned there is something which might 
convince the munchkins that you're a witch. They 
might even give you their enchanted broom. Perhaps 
if you put on that blue calico dress you came across 
earlier in the story. . . 



5. Unlike other "adventure games" that you may 
have played, there are many possible routes to the 
end of ZORK. Some puzzles have more than one 
solution; other puzzles don't need to be solved at all. 
Sometimes you will have to solve one puzzle in order 
to obtain the item(s) or information you need to solve 
another puzzle. 

6. You may find it helpful to explore ZORK with an- 
other person. Different people may find different 
puzzles easy and can often complement each other. 

7. If you really have difficulty, you can order a hint 
booklet and a complete map using the order form in 
your package. You don't need the hint booklet to 
enjoy the story, but it will make solving ZORK I 
easier. 

8. Read the sample transcript on page 21 to get a feel 
for how Infocom's interactive fiction works. 

9. You can word a command in many different ways. 
For example, to turn the brass lantern on, you could 
use any of the following: 

> LIGHT LAMP. 

> TURN ON THE LAMP. 

> TURN THE LAMP ON. 

> ACTIVATE THE LAMP. 

> LIGHT THE BRASS LANTERN. 

In fact, if the lamp is the only light source present, 
just typing LIGHT is enough, since ZORK will as- 
sume you meant the lamp. But more about that in 
the next section... 



Instruction Manual 13 



Communicating with ZORK 

In ZORK, you type your sentence in plain English 
each time you see the prompt (>). ZORK usually 
acts as if your sentence begins "I want to...," al- 
though you shouldn't actually type those words. You 
can use the words like "THE" if you want, and you can 
use capital letters if you want; ZORK doesn't care 
either way. 

When you finish typing a sentence, press the RE- 
TURN (or ENTER) key and ZORK will process your 
request. ZORK will respond, telling you whether your 
request is possible at this point in the story and what 
happened as a result. 

ZORK recognizes your words by their first six 
letters, and all subsequent letters are ignored. 
Therefore, CANDLE, CANDLEs and CANDLEstick 
would all be treated as the same word by ZORK. 

To move around, just type the desired direction. 
You can use the eight compass directions: NORTH, 
SOUTH, EAST, WEST, NORTHEAST, NORTHWEST, 
SOUTHEAST and SOUTHWEST. You can abbreviate 
these to N, S, E, W, NE, NW, SE and SW, respec- 
tively. You can use UP (or U) and DOWN (or D). IN 
and OUT will also work in certain places. 



ZORK understands many different kinds of sen- 
tences. Here are several examples. (Note that some 
of these objects do not actually appear in ZORK.) 

> WALK NORTH 

> DOWN 

> NE 

> GO SOUTH 

> U 

> TAKE BOX 

> PICK UP THE WOODEN BOX 

> DROP IT 

> PUSH THE BUTTON 

> OPEN THE WOODEN DOOR 

> EXAMINE THE SCUBA GEAR 

> LOOK BEHIND THE STATUE 

> LOOK UNDER THE ROCK 

> LOOK INSIDE THE BUBBLING CAULDRON 

> KILL THE BEAR WITH THE GUN 

> SHOOT BEAR WITH LARGE RIFLE 

You can use multiple objects with certain verbs if 
you separate them by the word AN D or by a comma. 
Some examples: 

> TAKE LAMP, JAR, FLUTE 

> DROP THE DAGGER, LANCE, AND MACE 

> PUT THE GOLD BAR AND THE PEARL IN THE 

TROPHY CASE 

The word ALL refers to every visible object except 
those inside something else. If there were an apple 
on the ground and an orange inside a cabinet, TAKE 
ALL would take the apple but not the orange. 

> TAKE ALL 

> TAKE ALL THE BOOKS 

> TAKE ALL FROM THE DESK 

> GIVE ALL BUT THE PENCIL TO THE NYMPH 

> DROP ALL EXCEPT THE DART GUN 



14 Instruction Manual 



You can include several sentences on one input 
line if you separate them by the word THEN or by a 
period. (Note that each sentence will still count as a 
turn.) You don't need a period at the end of the input 
line. For example, you could type all of the following 
at once, before pressing the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key: 

> NORTH. READ THE BOOK.DROP IT THEN BURN 

IT WITH TORCH 

If ZORK doesn't understand one of the sentences in 
your input line, or if something unusual happens, it 
will ignore the rest of your input line (see "ZORK 
Complaints" on page 20). 

There are only two kinds of questions that ZORK 
understands: WHAT and WHERE. Here are two 
examples that you can actually try in ZORK: 

> WHAT ISA GRUE? 

> WHERE ISTHEZORKMID? 

You will meet other people and creatures as you 
explore ZORK. You can "talk" to some of these 
beings by typing their name, then a comma, 
then whatever you want them to do. Here are 
some examples: 

> GNOME, GIVE ME THE KEY 

> TREE SPRITE, OPEN THE SECRET DOOR 
>JOEL, WAIT HERE 

> WARLOCK, TAKE THE SPELL SCROLL 

THEN FOLLOW ME 

> MIKE, NORTH. GET THE BRAN MUFFIN. 

THROW IT AT THE DWARF 

Notice that in the last two examples, you are giving 
one person more than one command on the same 
input line. 

You can use quotes to answer a question or say 
something "out loud." For example: 

> SAY "HELLO SAILOR" 

> ANSWER "A ZEBRA" 



ZORK tries to guess what you really mean when 
you don't give enough information. For example, if 
you say that you want to do something, but not what 
you want to do it to or with, ZORK will sometimes 
decide that there is only one possible object that you 
could mean. When it does so, it will tell you. For 
example: 

> BURN THE KINDLING 
(with the torch) 

The kindling catches fire and is consumed. 

or 

>GIVE THE SWORD 
(to the gnome) 

The gnome, a sworn pacifist, refuses to take it. 

If your sentence is ambiguous, ZORK will ask 
what you really mean. You can answer most of these 
questions briefly by supplying the missing informa- 
tion, rather than typing the entire input again. You 
can do this only at the very next prompt. Some ex- 
amples: 

> TIE THE ROPE 

What do you want to tie the rope to? 

> THE MAST 

The rope is now tied to the mast. 

or 

> HIT THE NAIL WITH THE HAMMER 

Which nail do you mean, the shiny nail or the rusty 
nail? 

> SHINY 

The shiny nail is driven halfway into the piece of 
wood. 

ZORK uses many words in its descriptions that it 
will not recognize in your sentences. For example, 
you might read, "Above you, moonlit clouds flit 
across the evening sky." However, if ZORK doesn't 
recognize the words SKY or CLOUDS in your input, 
you can assume that the sky and clouds are not im- 
portant to your completion of the story, except to 
provide you with a more vivid description of where 
you are or what is going on. ZORK recognizes over 
600 words, nearly all that you are likely to use in 
your sentences. If ZORK doesn't know a word you 
used, or any of its common synonyms, you are al- 
most certainly trying something that is not important 
in your adventure. 



Instruction Manual 



Starting and Stopping 

Starting the story: Now that you know what to expect 
when you venture into the caverns of ZORK, it's 
time for you to "boot" your disk. To load ZORK, 
follow the instructions on the Reference Card in your 
ZORK I package. 

Following the copyright notice and the release 
number of the story, you will see a description of the 
place where the story begins. 

Here's a quick exercise to help you get accus- 
tomed to interacting with ZORK I. Try the following 
command first: 

> OPEN THE MAILBOX 

Then press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. ZORK I 
will respond with: 

Opening the mailbox reveals a leaflet. 

Now try: 

> READ THE LEAFLET 

After you press the RETURN (or ENTER) key, ZORK 
I will respond: 

(Taken) 

Welcome to ZORK! 

ZORK is a story of adventure, danger and low cunning. 
In it you will explore some of the most amazing territory 
ever seen by mortals. No computer should be without 
one. 



Saving and restoring: It will probably take you many 
days to complete ZORK I. Using the SAVE feature, 
you can continue at a later time without having to 
start over from the beginning, just as you can place a 
bookmark in a book you are reading. SAVE puts a 
"snapshot" of your place in the story onto another 
diskette. If you are a cautious adventurer, you may 
want to save your place before (or after) trying 
something dangerous or tricky. That way, you can go 
back to that position later, even if you have gotten 
lost or "killed" since then. 

To save your place in the story, type SAVE at the 
prompt (>), and then press the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key. Then follow the instructions for saving and re- 
storing on your Reference Card. Some systems re- 
quire a blank disk, initialized and formatted, for 
saves. Using a disk with data on it (not counting 
other ZORK saves) may result in the loss of that data, 
depending on your system. 

You can restore a saved position any time you 
want. To do so, type RESTORE at the prompt (>), 
and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. Then follow 
the instructions on your Reference Card. You can 
then continue the story from the point where you 
used the SAVE command. You can type LOOK for a 
description of where you are. 

Quitting and restarting: If you want to start over 
from the beginning of the story, type RESTART. 
(This is usually faster than re-booting.) Just to make 
sure, ZORK will ask if you really want to start over. 
If you do, type Y or YES, and press the RETURN 
(or ENTER) key. 

If you want to stop, type QUIT. Once again, 
ZORK will ask if this is really what you want to do. 
If you do, type Y and press the RETURN key. 

Remember when you RESTART or QUIT: if you 
want to be able to return to your current position, you 
must first do a SAVE. 



1 6 Instruction Manual 



Appendix A 

Quick Reference Guide 

The object of ZORK I is to find the treasures of the 
Great Underground Empire and put them in your 
trophy case. 

1 . To start the story ("boot up"), see the separate 
Reference Card in your ZORK package. 

2. When you see the prompt (>) on your screen, 
ZORK is waiting for your command. There are 
four kinds of sentences or commands that ZORK 
understands: 

A. Direction commands: To move from place to 
place, just type the direction you want to go: N (or 
NORTH), E, S, W, NE, SE, NW, SW, U (or UP), 
D, IN, OUT. 

B. Actions: Just type whatever you want to do. 
Some examples: READ THE BOOK or OPEN THE 
DOOR or LOOK THROUGH THE WINDOW. 

Once you're familiar with simple commands, 
you'll want to use more complex ones as described 
in "Communicating with ZORK" on page 14. 

C. Commands given to people: To talk to charac- 
ters in the story, type their name, then a comma, 
then what you want to say to them. For example: 
TROLL, GIVE ME THE AXE or OLD MAN, GO 
NORTH. 

D. Special one- word commands: some one-word 
commands, such as INVENTORY or DIAGNOSE, 

give you specific information or affect your output. 
A list of these appears in the "Important Com- 
mands" appendix on page 18. 



3. Important! After typing your sentence or com- 
mand, you must press the RETURN (or ENTER) key 
before ZORK will respond. 

4. On most computers, your screen will have a spe- 
cial line called the status line. It tells you the name 
of your current location, your score, and the number 
of turns you have taken. 

5. You can pick up and carry many of the items you'll 
find in the story. For example, if you type TAKE THE 
NECKLACE, you will be carrying it. Type INVEN- 
TORY to see a list of everything you are carrying. 

6. When you want to stop, save your place for later, 
or start over, read the "Starting and Stopping" sec- 
tion on page 16. 

7. If you have trouble, refer to the specific section of 
the manual for more detailed instructions. 



Instruction Manual 17 



Appendix B 
Important Commands 

There are a number of one-word commands which 
you can type instead of a sentence. You can use them 
over and over as needed. Some count as a turn, 
others do not. Type the command after the prompt 
(>) and hit the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 

AGAIN — ZORK will usually respond as if you had 
repeated your previous sentence. Among the cases 
where AGAIN will not work is if you were just talking 
to another character. You can abbreviate AGAI N to 
G. 

BRIEF — This tells ZORK to give you the full descrip- 
tion of a location only the first time you enter it. On 
subsequent visits, ZORK will tell you only the name 
of the location and the objects present. This is how 
ZORK will normally act, unless you tell it otherwise 
using the VERBOSE or SUPERBRIEF commands. 



DIAGNOSE — ZORK will give you a medical report 
of your physical condition. This is particularly useful if 
you have just survived a dangerous battle or if you are 
under the effects of a magical spell. 

INVENTORY — ZORK will list what you are carry- 
ing. You can abbreviate INVENTORY to I. 

LOOK — This tells ZORK to describe your location in 
full detail. You can abbreviate LOOK to L. 

QUIT — This lets you stop. If you want to save your 
position before quitting, follow the instructions in 
"Starting and Stopping" on page 16. You can abbrevi- 
ate QUIT to Q. 

RESTART — This stops the story and starts over from 
the beginning. 

RESTORE — This restores a story position made using 
the SAVE command. See "Starting and Stopping" for 
more details. 

SAVE — This makes a "snapshot" of your current 
story position onto your storage disk. You can return 
to a saved position in the future using the RESTORE 
command. See "Starting and Stopping" for more 
details. 

SCORE — ZORK will show your current score and 
the number of turns you have taken. It will also tell 
you your rank, which is based on your score. 



1 8 Instruction Manual 



SCRIPT — This command tells your printer to begin 
making a transcript of the story as you venture on- 
wards. A transcript may aid your memory but is not 
necessary. It will work only on certain computers; 
read your Reference Card for details. 

SUPERBRIEF — This commands ZORK to display only 
the name of a place you have entered, even if you 
have never been there before. In this mode, ZORK 
will not even mention which objects are present. Of 
course, you can always get a description of your 
location, and the items there, by typing LOOK. In 
SUPERBRIEF mode, the blank line between turns will 
be eliminated. This mode is meant for adventurers 
who are already very familiar with the geography. 
Also see VERBOSE and BRIEF. 

UNSCRIPT — This commands your printer to stop 
making a transcript. 

VERBOSE — This tells ZORK that you want a com- 
plete description of each location and the objects in it 
every time you enter a location, even if you've been 
there before. Also see BRIEF and SUPERBRIEF. 

VERSION — ZORK responds by showing you the 
release number and the serial number of your copy of 
the story. Please include this information if you ever 
report a "bug" in ZORK. 

WAIT — This will cause time in the story to pass. 
Normally, between turns, nothing happens in the 
story. You could leave your computer, take a nap and 
return to the story to find that nothing has changed. 
You can use WAIT to make time pass in the story 
without doing anything. For example, if you encoun- 
ter an alien being, you could WAIT to see what it will 
do. Or, if you are in a moving vehicle, you could 
WAIT to see where it will go. You can abbreviate 
WAIT to Z. 



Appendix C 

Some Recognized Verbs 

This is only a partial list of the verbs that all three 
ZORK adventures understand. There are many 
more. Remember that you can use a variety of prep- 
ositions with them. For example, LOOK can become 
LOOK INSIDE, LOOK BEHIND, LOOK UNDER, 
LOOK THROUGH, LOOK AT and so on. 



ANSWER 


FOLLOW 


SAY 


ATTACK 


GIVE 


SEARCH 


BLOW 


INFLATE 


SHAKE 


BREAK 


JUMP 


SLIDE 


BURN 


KICK 


SMELL 


CLIMB 


KNOCK 


STAY 


CLOSE 


LIGHT 


STRIKE 


COUNT 


LISTEN 


SWIM 


CROSS 


LOCK 


TAKE 


CUT 


LOOK 


TELL 


DEFLATE 


LOWER 


THROW 


DIG 


MOVE 


TIE 


DRINK 


OPEN 


TOUCH 


DROP 


POUR 


TURN 


EAT 


PRAY 


UNLOCK 


ENTER 


PULL 


WAKE 


EXAMINE 


PUSH 


WALK 


EXIT 


PUT 


WAVE 


EXTINGUISH 


RAISE 


WEAR 


FILL 


READ 


WIND 



Instruction Manual 19 



Appendix D 
ZORK Complaints 

ZORK will complain if you type a sentence that con- 
fuses it completely. ZORK will then ignore the rest 
of the input line. (Unusual events, such as being 
attacked, may also cause ZORK to ignore the rest of 
the sentences you typed, since the event may have 
changed your situation drastically.) Some of ZORK's 
complaints: 

I DON'T KNOW THE WORD "(your word)." The 
word you typed is not in the story's vocabulary. 
Sometimes using a synonym or rephrasing will help. 
If not, ZORK probably doesn't know the idea you 
were trying to get across. 

YOU USED THE WORD "(your word)" IN A WAY 
THAT I DON'T UNDERSTAND. ZORK knows the 
word you typed, but couldn't use it in that sense. 
Usually this is because ZORK knows the word as a 
different part of speech. For example, if you typed 
PRESS THE LOWER BUTTON, you are using LOWER 
as an adjective, but ZORK might know LOWER only 
as a verb, as in LOWER THE ROPE. 

THAT SENTENCE ISN'T ONE I RECOGNIZE. The 

sentence you typed may have been gibberish, such 
as GIVE TROLL WITH SWORD. Or, you may have 
typed a reasonable sentence but used a syntax that 
ZORK does not recognize, such as SMELL UNDER 
THE ROCK. Try rephrasing the sentence. 



THERE WAS NO VERB IN THAT SENTENCE! Unless 
you are answering a question, each sentence must 
have a verb (or a command) in it somewhere. 

THERE SEEMS TO BE A NOUN MISSING IN THAT 
SENTENCE! This usually means that your sentence 
was incomplete, such as EAT THE BLUE. 

THERE WERE TOO MANY NOUNS IN THAT SEN- 
TENCE. An example is PUT THE SOUP IN THE BOWL 
WITH THE LADLE, which has three noun "phrases," 
one more than ZORK can digest in a single action. 

I BEG YOUR PARDON? You hit the RETURN 
(or ENTER) key without typing anything. 

IT'S TOO DARK TO SEE. In the story, there was not 
enough light to perform your action. 

I DON'T SEE WHAT YOU ARE REFERRING TO. You 
used HIM, HER or IT, but ZORK isn't sure what per- 
son or object you meant. 

YOU CAN'T SEE ANY "(object)" HERE! The item 
you referred to was not visible. It may be some- 
where else, inside a closed container, and so on. 

THE OTHER OBJECT(S) THAT YOU MENTIONED 
ISN'T (AREN'T) HERE. You referred to two or more 
items in the same sentence, and at least one of them 
wasn't visible to you in your present location. 

YOU CAN'T GO THAT WAY. There was no passage 
or exit in the direction you tried to move. 

YOU CAN'T USE MULTIPLE (IN)DIRECT OBJECTS 
WITH "(your verb)." You can refer to several items 
at the same time only with certain verbs. Among the 
more useful of these verbs are TAKE, DROP and PUT. 
This restriction also applies to the use of ALL, as in 
DROP ALL. For example, ATTACK will not work with 
multiple objects; you couldn't say ATTACK ALL or 
ATTACK THE WARLOCK AND THE ENCHANTER. 



20 Instruction Manual 



Appendix E 

Sample Transcript and Map 

This transcript is not from any of the ZORK adven- 
tures, but it does show most of the usual things you 
can do in ZORK. It contains several simple puzzles 
and their solutions, and it will give you a good idea of 
how Infocom's interactive fiction works. The player's 
sentences appear in capital letters after each prompt 
(>). The map represents the terrain in the sample 
transcript as you might have drawn it. 



SNOW MOtfSTER 



MONSTER^ 




0RAN6E 
GflWE 


LAIR 











U 



SHOP 



6MOME 



OFFICE 



MOSS- 
UNEP 
TDNNEL 



(via . 



> APPLY THE BRAKES 

The Frobozz Magic Go-Cart coasts to a stop. 

Moss-lined Tunnel, in the Go-Cart 

This is a long east-west tunnel whose walls are covered 

with green and yellow mosses. 

There is a jewel-studded monkey wrench here, (outside 
the Go-Cart) 

A bent and rusted monkey wrench is lying here, (outside 
the Go-Cart) 

> TAKE THE WRENCH 

Which wrench do you mean, the jeweled monkey 
wrench or the rusty monkey wrench? 

> JEWELED 

You can't reach it from inside the Go-Cart. 



> WEST 

You're not going anywhere until you stand up. 

> GET OUT OF THE GO-CART 
You are on your own feet again. 

> TAKE THE JEWELED WRENCH 
Taken. 

> WEST 
Lumber Yard 

This is a huge room lined with metal shelves. There are 

exits to the east, northeast, and west. 

There is a small cardboard box here. 

Piled on one of the shelves is a supply of lumber. 

> TAKE THE BOX AND THE LUMBER 
small cardboard box: Taken. 

supply of lumber: Your load is too heavy. 

> INVENTORY 
You are carrying: 

a lamp (providing light) 
a glass jar 

The glass jar contains: 

a quantity of pomegranate juice 
a jeweled monkey wrench 
a dart gun 

a small cardboard box 

> DROP THE DART GUN 
Dropped. 

> TAKE THE LUMBER 
Taken. 

> LOOK INSIDE THE BOX 

The small cardboard box is closed. 

>OPEN IT 

Opening the small cardboard box reveals a bunch of 
two-inch nails. 

> EXAMINE THE LUMBER 

It consists of two rectangular pieces of wood, about 1 
feet long, and perhaps a dozen shorter dowel-shaped 
pieces. 

> WALK NORTHEAST 
Foreman's Office 

This is the office of the lumber yard foreman. The only 
exit is to the southwest. 



Instruction Manual 2 1 



>sw 

Lumber Yard 

There is a dart gun here. 

> WALK WEST 
Carpentry Shop 

You are in a room furnished with wooden shelves, cabi- 
nets, mantels and moldings, all gracefully carved out of 
fine wood. An array of precision tools adorns the walls. 
The only exit is south... unless you want to count the 
opening in the roof. 

A carpenter gnome is sitting here, twiddling his thumbs. 
>UP 

The opening is too high to reach. 

>GNOME, BUILD A LADDER 
"I'd be glad to, but not for free!" 

> GIVE THE JEWELED MONKEY WRENCH TO THE 
GNOME 

The gnome examines the jeweled monkey wrench care- 
fully. "Thank you," he exclaims, adding it to his collection 
of tools. 

> GNOME, BUILD A LADDER 

"Oh, yes, your ladder. Unfortunately, I have no 
lumber." 

> GIVE THE LUMBER TO THE GNOME 
The gnome accepts the supply of lumber. 

> GNOME, BUILD LADDER 
"Darn it! I'm fresh out of nails." 

>GIVE NAILS 
(to the gnome) 

The gnome accepts the bunch of nails. 

> GIVE THE LAMP TO THE GNOME 

The gnome attempts to build a beautiful set of kitchen 
cabinets out of the lamp. Finally, he gives up and hands 
it back to you. 

> GNOME, BUILD LADDER 

The gnome grumbles but constructs a handsome 
wooden ladder. He admires his handiwork and hands 
you the ladder. 

> PUT THE LADER THROUGH THE HOLE 
I don't know the word "lader." 



> PUT THE LADDER THROUGH THE HOLE 

The ladder is now resting against the rim of the hole. 

> UP 

You're carrying too much to climb a ladder. 
>l 

You are carrying: 
a lamp (providing light) 
a glass jar 

The glass jar contains: 

a quantity of pomegranate juice 
a small cardboard box 

> DROP ALL BUT THE LAMP 
glass jar: Dropped. 

small cardboard box: Dropped. 

> LOOK 
Carpentry Shop 

You are in a room furnished with wooden shelves, cabi- 
nets, mantels and moldings, all gracefully carved out of 
fine wood. An array of precision tools adorns the walls. 
The only exit is south... unless you want to count the 
opening in the roof. 

A carpenter gnome is sitting here, twiddling his thumbs. 
There is a glass jar here. 
The glass jar contains: 

a quantity of pomegranate juice 
There is a small cardboard box here. 

> UP 

Monster's Lair 

This is the den of the dreaded Seven-Headed Snow 
Monster of Snurth. It is quite chilly in here, and ice covers 
the floor and walls. A ladder protrudes from a hole in 
the ground, and sunlight comes from the cave entrance 
to the east. 

The Snow Monster, bellowing loudly, blocks the eastern 
exit. 

> DOWN.SOUTH.TAKE DART GUN.WEST.UP 
Carpentry Shop 

A carpenter gnome is sitting here, twiddling his thumbs. 
There is a glass jar here. 
The glass jar contains: 

a quantity of pomegranate juice 
There is a small cardboard box here. 



22 Instruction Manual 



Lumber Yard 

There is a dart gun here. 

Taken. 

Carpentry Shop 

A carpenter gnome is sitting here, twiddling his thumbs. 
There is a glass jar here. 
The glass jar contains: 

a quantity of pomegranate juice 
There is a small cardboard box here. 

Monster's Lair 

The Snow Monster, bellowing loudly, blocks the eastern 
exit. 

> SHOOT MONSTER 

What do you want to shoot the monster with? 

> DART GUN 

The Snow Monster clutches at the dart and then keels 
over. His body vanishes in a cloud of acrid black smoke. 

> EAST 

Orange Grove 

A path leads northeast through this small grove of or- 
ange trees. A dark cave lies to the west. A sign is posted 
near the grove. 

> READ THE SIGN 

"Warning! These are poisonous oranges, not meant 
for human consumption. 

— Farmer Bozbar" 

> EAT AN ORANGE 

Aaarrrr! It burns your tongue and your throat! 

***You have died*** 

A forest sprite appears, looking concerned. "You've 
done it again," says the sprite, with a mixture of sympa- 
thy and disgust. "I'll give you only one more chance." 
She sprinkles some fairy dust on you... 

Wooden Bridge 
There is a lamp here. 

> LOOK 
Wooden Bridge 

You are on a sturdy bridge leading northeast to south- 
west. The river below flows quickly amongst pointy rocks. 

There is a lamp here. 



Appendix F 

We're Never Satisfied 

Here at Infocom, we take great pride in the quality of 
our stories. Even after they're "out the door," we're 
constantly improving, honing and perfecting. 

Your input is important. No matter how much 
testing we do, it seems that some "bugs" never 
crawl into view until thousands of you begin doing all 
those wild and crazy things to the story. If you find a 
bug, or if you think a certain puzzle was too hard or 
too easy, or if you have some other suggestion, or if 
you'd just like to tell us your opinion of ZORK, drop 
us a note! We love every excuse to stop working, and 
a letter from you is just such an excuse! Write to: 

INFOCOM, INC. 

125 CambridgePark Drive 

Cambridge, MA 02140 

Attn: DIMWIT FLATHEAD 

Appendix G 

If You Have Technical Problems 

You can call the Infocom Technical Support Team to 
report bugs and technical problems, but not for hints 
to solve puzzles, at (617) 576-3190. If your disk de- 
velops a problem within ninety (90) days after pur- 
chase, we will replace it at no charge. Otherwise, 
there is a replacement fee of $5.00 (U.S. currency). 
If you call to report a bug, please provide your re- 
lease number, which you can find by typing VER- 
SION. Please return your registration card if you'd 
like to be on our mailing list and receive our newslet- 
ter, THE NEW ZORK TIMES. 



Instruction Manual 23 



Appendix H 
Author Biographies 
Marc Blank. A graduate of MIT and the Albert 
Einstein College of Medicine, Marc has been involved 
in writing interactive fiction since its formative period 
in the late 1970s. Co-author of the original mainframe 
version of ZORK in 1977, he was instrumental in lay- 
ing the groundwork for the appearance of interactive 
fiction on personal computers in the early 1980s. 
He is co-author of ZORK I, ZORK II, ZORK III and 
ENCHANTER,® and is sole author of DEADLINE,® 
the first interactive mystery. His continuing work in 
interactive technologies in large part made Infocom's 
name synonymous with interactive fiction. His 
mother still wishes he would practice medicine. 

Dave Lebling. Dave Lebling was born in Washington, 
D.C. and grew up in suburban Maryland. He at- 
tended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and worked at MIT's Laboratory for Computer Sci- 
ence, where he developed an interest in computer 
entertainments. He was a co-author of the original 
mainframe ZORK. He has co-authored ZORK I, 
ZORK II, ZORK III and ENCHANTER, and written 
STARCROSS® on his own. He is married and lives 
in a suburb of Boston, where his appetite for the 
printed word is restrained only by the volume of 
his house. 



Appendix I 

Warranty and Copyright Information 
Limited Warranty 

This software product and the attached instructional materials are sold 
"AS IS," without warranty as to their performance. The entire risk as to 
the quality and performance of the computer software program is as- 
sumed by the user. 

However, to the original purchaser of a disk prepared by Infocom 
and carrying the Infocom label on the disk jacket, Infocom, Inc. war- 
rants the medium on which the program is recorded to be free from 
defects in materials and faulty workmanship under normal use and 
service for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. If 
during this period a defect on the medium should occur, the medium 
may be returned to Infocom, Inc. or to an authorized Infocom, Inc. 
dealer, and Infocom, Inc. will replace the medium without charge to 
you. Your sole and exclusive remedy in the event of a defect is ex- 
pressly limited to replacement of the medium as provided above. This 
warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other 
rights which vary from state to state. 

THE ABOVE WARRANTIES FOR GOODS ARE IN LIEU OF 
ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, IN- 
CLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRAN- 
TIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A 
PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND OF ANY OTHER WARRANTY OB- 
LIGATION ON THE PART OF INFOCOM, INC. SOME STATES 
DO NOTALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED 
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT 
APPLY TO YOU. IN NO EVENT SHALL INFOCOM, INC. OR 
ANYONE ELSE WHO HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN THE CREATION 
AND PRODUCTION OF THIS COMPUTER SOFTWARE PRO- 
GRAM BE LIABLE FOR INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSE- 
QUENTIAL DAMAGES, SUCH AS, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS 
OF ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR BENEFITS RESULTING FROM 
THE USE OF THIS PROGRAM, OR ARISING OUT OF ANY 
BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW 
THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CON- 
SEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY 
NOT APPLY TO YOU. 

N.B. After the warranty period, a defective Infocom disk may be 
returned to Infocom, Inc. with a check or money order for $5.00 (U.S. 
currency) for replacement. 

Copyright 

The enclosed software product is copyrighted and all rights are re- 
served by Infocom, Inc. It is published exclusively by Infocom, Inc. The 
distribution and sale of this product are intended for the use of the origi- 
nal purchaser only and for use only on the computer system specified. 
Lawful users of this program are hereby licensed only to read the pro- 
gram from its medium into memory of a computer solely for the pur- 
pose of executing the program. Copying (except for one backup copy on 
those systems which provide for it—see Reference Card), duplicating, 
selling, or otherwise distributing this product is a violation of the law. 

This manual and all other documentation contained herein are copy- 
righted and all rights are reserved by Infocom, Inc. These documents 
may not, in whole or in part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, 
translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable 
form without prior consent, in writing, from Infocom, Inc. 

Willful violations of the Copyright Law of the United States can result 
in civil damages of up to $50,000 in addition to actual damages, plus 
criminal penalties of up to one year imprisonment and/or $10,000 fine. 

ZORK, DEADLINE, ENCHANTER and STARCROSS are 
registered trademarks of Infocom, Inc. 
© 1984 Infocom, Inc. 
Printed in U.S.A. 

© 2001 Activision, Inc. Reproduced with permission. All right reserved. 



24 Instruction Manual 



t m 

i k / ■ 



V I* i 



The fai nt-of-heart need not apply! 

ate 141 



As for the dauntless, prepare to encounterthe unknown. The 
long-abandoned Great Underground Empire— a fantastic realm 
of magic and mystery — is yours for the exploring. 

Abandoned, yes— but the Empire is not totally uninhabited. 
Still lurking in its crags and crevice^ are numerous creatures 
with whom you must match wits, skill and bravery— a thief, a 
troll and other troglodytes of equally III repute. Your survival 
depends on how successfully you vie with these denizens and 
solve the subterranean world's manifold puzzles, But before you 
can truly emerge victorious from the cavernous quarters of Zork, 
you must collect its many priceless treasures and safely bear 
them to daylight. 1 MfvJ j 

Courage, cunning and logic. You vyill need them all to triumph. 
The Great Underground Empire await*. We dare yoii to enterftM 

The liable of Contends for the manual is on page 11* TaKe a loAk 
at ifcto determine what you should read before you start the story. 



II 

l V )'■>'/ I 

' <V'i' 







1 sjj^jtevgvu | 

ii ' 





Buried deep within every ZORK I package: your ZORK I disk, a complete history of the Great Underground Empire 
and an incredible map not sold at any gas station known to Mankind. 



> Throw the sack at the troll 

The troll, who is remarkably 
coordinated, catches the brown sack 
and, not having the most discrimi- 
nating taste, gleefully eats it. The 
flat of the troll's axe hits you on the 
head... 

WELCOME TO ZORK I: THE 
GREAT UNDERGROUND EMPIRE. 

It beckons you into a world fraught 
with danger and discovery. Using 
all the cunning you can muster, 
you'll plunge far below the surface 
of the earth in search of the 
incomparable Treasures of Zork. 
But this is no mere treasure hunt. 
During your amazing journey, 
you'll come face to face with 
creatures so outlandish, they defy 
description. And you'll wander 
through an underground domain so 
vast, it can offer you new sur- 
prises no matter how many times 
you explore it. 

GET INSIDE A STORY. 
GET ONE FROM INFOCOM! 

It's like waking up inside a story! 
Load Infocom's interactive fiction 
into your computer and discover 



yourself at the center of a world 
jam-packed with surprising twists, 
unique characters and original, 
logical, often hilarious puzzles. 

For the first time, you're more 
than a passive reader. You can talk 
to the story, typing in full English 
sentences. And the story talks 
right back, communicating entirely 
in vividly descriptive prose. What's 
more, you can actually shape the 
story's course of events through 
your choice of actions. And you 
have hundreds of alternatives at 
every step. In fact, there's so 
much you can see and do, your 
adventure can last for weeks and 
even months. 

To find the Infocom interactive 
story that's right for you, just 
choose any one marked with the 
level of difficulty listed below that 
best matches your current level of 
interactive skill. 

Introductory: Best introduction 
to interactive fiction, with some 
built-in hints. Written for everyone 
from age 9 up. 

Standard: This is Infocom's most 
popular level of interactive fiction, 
enjoyed by both first- time and 
experienced players. 



Advanced: A greater level of chal- 
lenge. Recommended for those 
who've already experienced 
Infocom's interactive fiction. 

Expert: The ultimate challenge in 
interactive fiction. 

Then find out what it's like to 
get inside a story. Get one from 
Infocom. Because with Infocom's 
interactive fiction, there's room 
for you on every disk. 

nFocom 

125 CambridgePark Drive., Cambridge, MA 02140 

Interactive Fiction is available for most personal 
computers. Call us at 617-576-3190 for availability 
information. 

Manufactured and Printed in USA 

© 1984 Infocom, Inc. 

Warranty information enclosed. 

ZORK is a registered trademark of Infocom, Inc.